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Friday, May 15, 2009

Media-Whore D'Oeuvres



"Ted Kennedy's getting immortalized whilst still with us. HBO is, as we speak, organizing a documentary on the senator. Titled 'Teddy,' produced by Peter Kunhardt, who's done stuff on Lincoln, JFK and Bobby, a 90-minute job is now in work. Not with actors. Mostly with archival footage and never-before-seen home movies. It'll stretch from childhood through Ted Kennedy's 2008 Democratic Convention speech. The cable channel's co-president Richard Plepler plans a special VIP screening in DC, but it premieres on the network in July." (CindyAdams)



"What better way to toast spring than with free-flowing Dom Perignon in a predominantly gold room with walls punctuated with smiling golden skulls and a super spirited crowd swaying to the music tended to by DJs Alexandra and Theodora Richards? Warm and wonderful PAPER market editor/blogger and host of the party Luigi Tadini (along with Amanda Hearst) even located a Josephine Baker doppelganger named The Maine Event to entertain in her real grape skirt -- and not much else!" (Papermag)



"With the international box office dominating the movie business in the way that it does, it is no wonder that Louise Chater has found her role growing in conversations about the studio’s summer blockbusters. Her London-based company, First Movies, conducts international market research -- focus groups in Mexico, trailer analysis in Russia, test screenings in India -- the same type of work that drives studio marketing choices in the States, while also driving studio executives to distraction. Russia and Japan, for example, share cultural similarities that affect movie marketing. In both of those countries, said Chater, people commonly attend movies solo. And in both of those cultures, the male-oriented, macho culture makes the action-adventure genre inherently strong. By contrast, Mediterranean and South American countries with strong Catholic traditions suggest other movie choices -- 'that tips into female-friendly movies, and family movies,' Chater said ... 'We can test whatever we’re asked to test, but I will not do box office projections,' she said. 'There are just too many variables. You have to factor in so many things -- you have to factor in the weather. And I still think it’s the wrong game to play.'" (TheWrap)



"Some in the U.S. government are contemplating embracing a policy change that may result in the next president of the World Bank being the first not to be from the United States. As a consequence, Brazil's President Lula might be on the verge of scoring an important electoral victory this week...on the other side of the planet, in the world's biggest exercise in democracy, the Indian parliamentary elections. Ah, globalization. Maybe in the flat world all politics aren't exactly local. You see, Lula, is looking for his next big challenge. According to those close to him, he would like something on the international stage, not surprising given the enormous good will and international support he has built up during his two very successful terms of office in Brasilia. Given the former labor leader's interest in social issues, particularly the plight of the world's poorest, those close to Lula say his ideal job would be doing something that can meaningfully help the disadvantaged in Africa and other hard-hit regions. The perfect opportunity may be right here in Washington, D.C. Because a job like that of head of the World Bank ideally fills the bill for Lula." (ForeignPolicy)



"On the second day of Cannes, the money side of the movie biz was sending mixed messages: While an unusually high number of early acquisitions were announced, offering the promise of prosperity, the market floor on the second day of selling was sparsely populated. Yet not all is troubled on the Croisette. Cannes Film Market topper Jerome Paillard said that as of Wednesday -- opening day -- there were 9,100 participants registered, although he expects that number to end up close to 10,000. That means there will only be 200 fewer participants than in 2008. There are roughly 1,500 market screenings scheduled, about 30 fewer than last year. Countries sending fewer people to the market include the U.S., with about 100 fewer attendees. But Paillard said the attrition wasn't that bad, noting the number of exhibitors was about the same as last year. 'Companies still come to Cannes because the consequences of not showing up can be very damaging in terms of image,' he said. 'A no-show definitely sends a warning signal throughout the industry.'" (Variety)

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