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Saturday, August 14, 2004

Tinkerbell: Missing: $1,000 Reward

hilton1b

One would think that heiress/tv star and soon-to-be music icon Paris Hilton could pony up more than the mere $1,000 put up for her missing dog, Tinkerbell.

According to The Sun: "The titchy chihuahua has been pinched and desperate Paris has put up a $1,000 reward for its safe return ... The hotel heiress is distraught after it went walkies just two days ago. Assistants were seen putting up posters and scouring the area near her home in Beverly Hills."

Which is bad news considering what Paris told Hollywood Life Magazine in June, "Tinkerbell is my life ... I love her so much, I can't imagine losing her. I will die when she dies. I really won't know what to do."

Neither will Tink. Thems mean streets to a dog used to wearing designer labels, booties and such, away from your $1500 dog carrier. Imagine the therapy bills when they find her.

If anyone has any information on this pampered teacup Chihuahua's whereabouts, please call Hilton's assistant, Wendy, at 310-858-5410.

Comment here or VH1's Best Week Ever Blog.

And, Darling Nicky Hilton gets married.


4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm appalled that someone would take her dog. A lot of fishy things have been happening in her life the past few weeks. Maybe it's time someone took a look into that nasty ex-boyfriend of hers. Poor little dog! And on TV, they said she had upped the reward to $5000. She most likely set the first generous award hoping it would entice the culprit(s) into returning Tinkerbell without drawing undue attention to it being her dog. It's such a mean thing to do! And incredibly immature. I just hope he comes back home safely. No one with any sense of ethics or character would do such a thing. What is this world coming to????

Sirius Pet Blogger said...

Dog Gone Missing�What�s an Heiress to Do?
Pet Expert, Charlotte Reed, offers Paris Hilton advice on how to find her beloved Chihuahua, Tinkerbell, missing since August 11, 2004.

(PRWEB) August 18, 2004 -- Pet care expert, magazine columnist and radio and television pet care personality, Charlotte Reed offers Paris Hilton advice on how to search for her beloved, lost Tinkerbell.

�Finding your beloved dog is difficult when you are under duress but it is important to act quickly,� says Charlotte Reed. �Miss Hilton will have to stop strolling the red carpet and spend quality time hitting the pavement in her Hollywood neighborhood looking for her tiny, four-legged friend. Just like on her hit tv show, The Simple Life 2: Road Trip, Paris should never go it alone. Perhaps, Nicole Richie and her dog, Honey will help Paris search for Tinkerbell."

Charlotte Reed offers eight strategies for finding a lost pet:

1. Search your property. Conduct a thorough examination inside and outside of your home during the day and at night. Start inside by looking behind furniture and appliances, under beds, in closets, in boxes. Finish outside by checking drain and sewer pipes, the garage, other out buildings, and the shrubbery. Also, consider where you live. Do wild animals such as coyotes come down to your neighborhood looking for food? Look for signs of a struggle or blood at the property line.

2. Make a flyer. Use 8- � X 11� fluorescent paper for higher visibility. Use a recent picture of your pet to make it easier for someone to spot her. List the date and place your dog was lost, breed, sex, age, weight, color, markings and a contact number. (Never give out all the identifying features so that if someone claims to have found your pet , they will be able to convince you by providing you with a full description.) Offer a reward. Post flyers at eye level on utility poles within a one mile radius from your home. Also, place them at veterinary offices, pet shops, grocery stores, grooming shops and neighborhood restaurants and local businesses. Frequently replenish flyer supplies at these locations.

3. Walk the neighborhood. Take turns with family members and walk around the neighborhood during day and night hours. Carry a flashlight to check in dark places. Also, bring your pet�s favorite squeaky toy and dog treats. Call her name and make familiar sounds that she regularly hears. It is important to stop often, be quiet and listen for your pet�s reply.

4. Tell your neighbors and those working in your neighborhood. Go from house to house and introduce yourself. Explain that your dog is missing. Tell neighborhood staff (housekeepers, guards, caretakers, gardeners) and municipal workers (postal carriers, garbage pick-up crews, police officers). Give them a flyer so that they can help you find your dog.

5. Visit your local animal control, humane societies, animal shelters. Control agencies usually keep an animal for only three (3) days. Visit these organizations by taking turns with family, friends and others. Leave flyers so that they can look for your pet too!

6. Contact your breed rescue group. Usually, pure bred dogs are rescued from shelters or animal control by breed rescue groups. These volunteers save their breeds and try to find homes for them quickly. Visit the American Kennel Club website (www.akc.org) to find the breed rescue chapter nearest you.

7. Find out if your pet has been killed on the road. Call the city, county and state department of transportation to see if you pet may have been killed on the road. Dogs are generally picked up every 24 hours.

8. Beware! Never wander around the neighborhood alone looking for your pet. Also, be cautious if some calls claiming to have your pet. Have them meet you with a family member or friend at a public location.

Charlotte Reed is a pet expert and columnist for several magazines, including Time Inc�s All You, Fido Friendly , Good Housekeeping and The Resident. A former attorney, Charlotte�s love for animals led her to switch careers and found Two Dogs & A Goat, a New York-based complete pet care service in 1996. Charlotte has shared her expertise on pets with millions of people through her Pet-Owning Made Easy series of booklets and her appearances on ABC�s The View, CNN, Good Day New York, Fox Pet News and other TV shows. She is currently writing two books on pet-related topics. She can speak about everything from pet health and insurance to pet etiquette.

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Anonymous said...

I'm calling her assistant to set up a date for mine and Paris' new sex video....

As Quagmier (sp?) says... Alllllriiiight...


Facebattle... ><

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