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Tuesday, May 05, 2015

Media-Whore D'Oeuvres









NBCABCCBS
• Total Viewers:7,726,0007,687,0006,576,000
• A25-54:1,726,0001,856,0001,528,000










"It’s another split win in the evenings, as NBC’s Lester Holt gives Nightly News a total viewer win — its first in 5 weeks — and ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir takes the A25-54 demo. NBC’s lead was a very slim .5 percent, while ABC’s win in the demo was by a much wider 7.5 percent. Even with big news from Baltimore last week, all three newscasts were down compared to the same week last year. Nightly News is down -14 percent in viewers and down -18 in the demo; World News Tonight is down -2 percent in viewers and down -11 percent in the demo; and the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley is down -7 percent in viewers and down -17 percent in the demo. This same week last year included coverage of severe weather across the nation." (TVNewser)


Benefactor Silas Chou and Dr. Henry Kissinger in the front row. Mr. Chou is the honorary chair of this year's Gala.


"It's always a pleasure to get invited to the Met's Press Preview for the annual exhibition at what is now known as the Anna Wintour Costume Center. Today was no exception. China: Through the Looking Glass curated by Andrew Bolton explores the impact of Chinese aesthetics on Western fashion and how China has fueled the fashionable imagination for centuries. In this collaboration between The Costume Institute and the Department of Asian Art, high fashion is juxtaposed with Chinese costumes, paintings, porcelains, and other art, including films, to reveal enchanting reflections of Chinese imagery. This year the exhibit is three times larger than those in the past, spanning 30,000 square feet and spread out over three floors. There is a total of 150 costumes and accessories as well as numerous film clips from such groundbreaking Chinese directors as Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, Ang Lee, and Wong Kar Wai. On hand for the press preview in the galleries were milliner Steven Jones, Met Curator in Charge Harold Koda, and Vogue's Hamish Bowles. Following a tour of the galleries, guests convened in the Temple of Dendur where remarks were made by Met Director Thomas Campbell, Marissa Mayer (CEO of Yahoo), Maxwell Hearn, Chairman of the Department of Asian Art (who greeted us in Chinese), Mr. Bolton, and Wong Kar Wai.  Seated front row and center: fashionista Dr. Henry Kissinger chatting with Asian billionaire Silas Chou. Kissinger told me that his wife Nancy would be attending the evening gala.  Other front rowers in addition to Anna Wintour included Wendi Murdoch, Oscar Tang, and Emily Rafferty, the recently retired President of the Met, with a cane as a result of  having recently had a collision with a golf cart in the Bahamas." (NYSD)





Jennifer Lopez in a fire dragon-embellished sheer gown from Atelier Versace.


"As a fashion statement, the red carpet at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art gala — that seemingly endless stretch of crimson that leads from Fifth Avenue, up the dozens of steps of the museum’s great staircase and into the Great Hall — occupies an odd netherland between runway and reality. What we see on it is the expression of a designer’s vision, dosed with some guidance from an actual person (as opposed to a model whose job it is to wear clothes, or at least as close to an actual person as a member of public-iety, that blend of publicity and society, can be) wearing the thing. The result has its own trends and tribulations, chief among the tribulations being the supposed need to dress according to the theme of the museum exhibition being celebrated. This year, that meant China, and complications ensued. If there is an overarching sartorial lesson to be gleaned from the hits and misses and jaw-dropping apparel adventures on view Monday night at the museum, it was this: 'Fancy dress' is more successfully read as 'fancy party dress' than as 'costume party dress.' Even Jean Paul Gaultier, who in his former ready-to-wear runway career never met a theme he didn’t like (1980s rock stars! Weddings! Butterflies!) seemed to understand this, and he wisely dressed his date, the singer Alicia Keys, in a full tulle skirt, midriff top and sharp cropped tuxedo jacket, for a coolly feminine version of white tie. That was the exception, however, rather than the rule — as were the rare straight-from-the-catwalk looks: Poppy Delevingne in poppy-bestrewn Marchesa (get it?!); Caroline Trentini and Karlie Kloss in Atelier Versace; FKA Twigs in a Christopher Kane dress collaged from naked silhouettes. For the most part, China references were rife, and they ranged from cliché to capes to color.Embroidered silks, for example, showed up on everyone from Georgia May Jagger’s Gucci robe — a little bit vintage, a little bit obvious — to Julie Macklowe’s cheongsam, though the ultimate expression of that idea was Chloë Sevigny’s hot mess of a J.W. Anderson pastiche. Headdresses were the Halloween-worthy accessory of the night, as seen on Sarah Jessica Parker, who twinned her Philip Treacy flame-crown with a custom black H&M one-shoulder silk gown speckled with red blooms; and the shoe designer Tabitha Simmons and the model-singer Karen Elson, both in elaborate gold Dolce & Gabbana — though those last two looked a little as if they had taken their dressing cues from dolls offered in Chinatown knickknack shops rather than from Milanese artistes." (NYT)



Photograph by Justin Bishop.


"According to the S.E.C.’s order, UBS gave high-frequency traders secret, illegal advantages in its dark pool over other investors who used the dark pool. Those other investors included 'many of the world’s largest asset managers, broker-dealers, and institutional investors, who may place trades on behalf of all kinds of investors, including pension funds and individuals with retail brokerage accounts.' The S.E.C.’s order went on to say that the illegal activity occurred 'at least from May 2008 through March 2011.' But that only scratches the surface of the problems with this response from UBS. According to the S.E.C., UBS, in clear violation of stock-market rules, secretly offered high-frequency traders the power to submit quotes in fractions of a cent. So, for instance, if the market for Facebook shares sat at 80.00–80.01, and an ordinary investor showed up willing to sell at 80.00, a high-frequency trader could jump ahead of all other would-be buyers and pay 80.0001 for the shares. That ridiculous fraction of a penny is what the high-frequency-trading lobby now peddles to the public as 'price improvement.' Still, a stock-market innocent might reasonably ask, Why would a high-frequency trader be so generous? And why, if he operates in the spirit of generosity, would UBS want to keep it a secret from ordinary investors? Why wouldn’t UBS shout from the rooftops of Zurich that it had made it possible for high-frequency traders to buy shares for a tiny bit more, or sell them for a tiny bit less, than the ordinary investors in the UBS dark pool? The long answer to that question took me a book to explain. The short answer is that the high-frequency trader in the UBS dark pool knows information about Facebook shares (i.e., when the price has changed in the wider market) a few milliseconds before the ordinary investors. He can bet on the horse race knowing the result." (VF)

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