blog advertising is good for you

Friday, March 25, 2011

Media-Whore D'Oeuvres


"The third mistake has been the tendency by Qaddafi to interfere in the internal affairs of many African countries, using the little money Libya has compared to those countries. One blatant example was his involvement with cultural leaders of black Africa -- kings, chiefs, etc. Since the political leaders of Africa had refused to back his project of an African government, Qaddafi, incredibly, thought that he could bypass them and work with these kings to implement his wishes. I warned Qaddafi in Addis Ababa that action would be taken against any Ugandan king who involved himself in politics, because it was against our Constitution. I moved a motion in Addis Ababa to expunge from the records of the AU all references to kings (cultural leaders) who had made speeches in our forum, because they had been invited there illegally by Colonel Qaddafi." (Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni)


"In Los Angeles, they buried Elizabeth Taylor at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale which is about a 45 minute drive from Beverly Hills. There is more than one celebrity cemetery in Los Angeles, and there is something 'impressive' about each place where A LOT of famous people are buried. Forest Lawn, which is almost a century old, is the 'final resting place' of some of the most famous names of the last century, especially movie stars. Gable, Lombard, Harlow, Bogart, Pickford, Burns and Allen, Tom Mix, Sammy Davis, Walt Disney, Alan Ladd, Norma Shearer, Chico Marx, Nat King Cole, Ethel Waters, Errol Fynn, Spencer Tracy and authors such as Louis L’Armour, Theodore Dreiser and L. Frank Baum who wrote 'The Wizard of Oz.' Elizabeth, almost 30. She had won an Oscar for 'Butterfield 8' and would soon enter into her most important relationship of her lifetime. Elizabeth Taylor came of age on screen in 'A Place In the Sun,' based on Dreiser’s 'An American Tragedy.' Notice how the Studio changed the title to something more upbeat than a 'tragedy.' However, when that decision was made to change it, the value of Taylor’s name and public image in selling the film was as important as, if not more important than the title of the film (which often ran under the name of the star). These matters explain the differences between a movie star today versus a Movie Star like Elizabeth Taylor. In the days of the Studio system, stars were products, or as we would say today: brands." (NYSocialDiary)


"In the early 1950s Gore Vidal wrote three mystery novels under the name Edgar Box. Now Vintage Crime has reissued them in separate volumes. The Box novels are minor works in the career of a writer who would become a versatile and prolific man of letters, but Vidal’s style — witty, literate, mischievous — is unmistakable. The novels are satirical comedies, and reflective of their time. In an introduction Vidal explains that the mysteries came to be written after his third literary novel, 'The City and the Pillar,' about a homosexual love affair, was rejected by The New York Times on moral grounds. The Times also declined to review his next five novels. He turned to mysteries at the suggestion of Victor Weybright, an editor at Dutton who was known for publishing mass paperback series of novels by authors who ranged from William Faulkner to Mickey Spillane. Vidal writes that Weybright had Spillane in mind when he suggested he write mysteries. 'I said that I didn’t think I was sufficiently stupid to be a popular author, but he said, ‘You’ll find a way.'" (Boston Globe)


"While in Libya, I was invited to meet Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi, Leader of the Revolution. The meeting took place at the Bab al-Azizia military barracks in the middle of Tripoli. I waited in a chilly room near the entrance, glad I was wearing my coat. Bashir Saleh Bashir, one of Qaddafi’s closest assistants, came to greet me and reiterate the government’s promise of full cooperation with our inspection of their nuclear program. A short time later, the foreign minister, Abd al-Rahman Shalgem, appeared and invited me inside. I was ushered into a large heated library. There was little furniture, just a big desk in front of rows of bookshelves holding a meager scattering of books in Arabic. Colonel Qaddafi, seated behind the desk in a traditional robe, invited Shalgem and me to take the chairs facing him. The ambience of the meeting matched the spartan look of the place. Qaddafi was more soft-spoken than I expected, his manner an odd mix of friendliness and reserve. His opening line was memorable: 'I don’t know how to put this,' he said, 'but why does the Egyptian government hate you?' He added quickly, 'The Egyptians are claiming that they can help us get rid of our weapons program better than you and your I.A.E.A. colleagues can.' Qaddafi then asked whether I was a Nasserite. 'You grew up during Nasser’s time in Egypt,' he said. 'You must be a Nasser fan.' 'I am not,' I answered, probably to his disappointment, since Nasser was reportedly his idol. 'Nasser had a very good vision and set of principles,' I added, 'but much of it failed in its implementation.' Qaddafi launched into a soliloquy on his decision to terminate his W.M.D. programs. He had reached the conclusion that weapons of mass destruction would not add to Libya’s security. They should be gotten rid of, he declared, not only in Libya but also in the Middle East and globally. Of course, I heartily agreed. Qaddafi digressed. He spoke glowingly about Libya’s place in world affairs, anecdotes that were not in all cases admirable. 'This little Libya,' he said proudly ..." (VanityFair)


"Perusing the list of artist for the upcoming Pantheon: A history of arts from the streets NYC show one could sight many academic similarities & differences however this is Plaztik Mag, lets just be real. Many of these artist don’t get flown on planes to fancy countries to do large scale murals funded by Coca-Cola, or have teams of people to help aid in putting their art work up for them. Instead, this is a group of 'Street Art Ninjas'. The daily foot soldiers communicating with one another in the language of the New York City Streets. Let me be clear about location, this is not a train yard in middle America or a rock you got drunk at & wrote your name on, these are the streets of NYC with many elements only a true warrior can successfully handle. The head Ninja would have to be Richard Hambleton better know as 'Shadow Man' he is the godfather of street art from the early 80’s." (Plaztikmag)


"At a party a few years back, another guest asked what I did, and I told him about the network of charter schools I founded in Harlem. Then he told me he'd created the TV show 'Survivor.' 'Oh,' I said. 'What's it about?' I don't remember Mark Burnett's reaction, but our host burst out laughing and proclaimed me 'the only person in America who hasn't seen that show.' The College Board, maker of the SAT college-entrance exam, would seem to agree. It kicked up a stir recently by making reality-TV the subject of an essay question: 'How authentic can these shows be when producers design challenges for the participants and then editors alter filmed scenes?' The controversy has mostly focused on the fairness issue -- are kids who watch no reality TV at a disadvantage? But the real issue is what the question reveals about our values and our vision for a 'college ready' student." (DEBORAH KENNY)

No comments: